Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Impact of Racial Identity Perceptions on the Perceived Ethnic Fit of Black Undergraduate Students at a HSI
by Taylor, Brandi, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 96; 22619927
Abstract (Summary)

Racial identity has long been shown to impact how Black students experience and navigate higher education. With a majority of these studies looking at racial identity through the lens of Cross’s Black identity model and only focusing on students at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs) and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), there are some significant gaps in the literature. This study sought to examine the impact of racial identity perceptions on the perceived ethnic fit of Black undergraduate students at an HSI. Using both the Perceived Ethnic Fit Scale and the Multidimensional Inventory of Black Identity (MIBI), racial ideology was found to have a significant relationship with perceived ethnic fit. Black students who held strong Assimilation ideology, Oppressed Minority ideology, and Humanist ideology had more ethnic fit while students who held strong Nationalist ideology experienced less ethnic fit. These findings suggest that there are significant intra-group differences amongst Black students and there is a need to increase focus on Black students attending HSIs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Davis, Shametrice
Commitee: Lewis, Pamela, Sawatzky, Misty, Claybrook, M Keith
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Advanced Studies in Education and Counseling
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/4(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education
Keywords: Black racial identity, higher education, HSI, perceived ethnic fit
Publication Number: 22619927
ISBN: 9781687964250
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