Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Overexpression of nSMase2 in 4T1 and E0771 Breast Cancer Cells Confers Varying Oncogenic Properties
by Miranda, Ian, M.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 2019, 44; 22619955
Abstract (Summary)

Cancer remains one of the deadliest diseases in the United States. One of the most prevalent types of cancer in women is breast cancer, second only to skin cancer. One major subtype of breast cancer is triple negative, and a majority of the triple negative class falls into another subclassification known as basal breast cancer. To date, there are very few targeted therapeutics for triple-negative cancers, but bioactive sphingolipids, especially ceramide have been shown to be possible targets for chemotherapeutics. Ceramide can be made through many pathways, and we are looking at the pathway involving the enzyme nSMase2. This enzyme has many functions in the body and many oncogenic functions, as well. In this study, we show, through overexpression of nSMase2 in 4T1 and E0771 basal breast cancer cell lines, that not all of these oncogenic functions suppress tumors. We found that nSMase2 overexpression does not affect monolayer growth or anchorage-independent survival. It does lead, though, to decreased anchorage-independent growth, increased migration, and increased experimental metastasis. These properties point to the possibility that nSMase2 can be a therapeutic anti-tumor target, especially for more aggressive stages, but more research is necessary to properly elucidate all of the enzyme’s biologies in vitro and in vivo.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Luberto, Chiara, Airola, Michael
Commitee:
School: State University of New York at Stony Brook
Department: Biochemistry and Cell Biology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 81/4(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biochemistry, Cellular biology
Keywords: 4T1, ceramide, E0771, nSMase2
Publication Number: 22619955
ISBN: 9781687962973
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