Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Supporting additive bilingualism of online English as second language (ESL) students through instructional design
by Otaola, Jose R., Ph.D., Capella University, 2008, 163; 3311405
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to measure to what extent additive bilingualism, a process where students learn a second language while continuing to develop proficiency in their first, can enhance the Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency of students. A secondary purpose of this study was to explore if additive bilingualism can enhance subject matter comprehension. The support of additive bilingualism in the online course was done by means of embedded instructional strategies that were borrowed from the practice and research already done in face-to-face courses. Before this study, there was no research in applying these instructional strategies to online courses. Significant differences were found between the treatment and control groups on their English proficiency and subject matter performance. The results indicate that providing instructional strategies that support additive bilingualism enhances Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency and subject matter comprehension. This study also points to directions for future research in this field and discovers important implications for teaching, educational administrators, and commerce.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Adkins, Mac
Commitee: Irlbeck, Sonja, LeBlanc, Alyce
School: Capella University
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 69/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Bilingual education, Multicultural education, Educational software, Higher education
Keywords: Additive bilingualism, Bilingualism, Cognitive development, ESL students, English as a second language, Instructional design, Multiculturalism, Online, Online learning
Publication Number: 3311405
ISBN: 9780549629276
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