Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Predicting Attitudes Towards Advertisement Strategy Based On Personality
by Skovron, Ezekiel B, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 103; 22583586
Abstract (Summary)

Myers, Sen, and Alexandrov (2010) theorizes that individuals who possess higher levels of certain personality dimensions will show a more favorable attitude towards different types of advertisement (ad) strategy. This thesis investigated, via an online survey, relationships between the Big Five personality dimensions and attitudes toward two advertisement strategy clusters: transformational versus informational, and comparative versus non-comparative. Results from a multivariate regression analysis revealed a variety of significant relationships, some of which supported the propositions of the Myers and associates theoretical framework. Individuals scoring high on extraversion favored all types of ad strategy, those scoring high on agreeableness favored both types of informational ads, those scoring high on conscientious favored transformational non-comparative ads, and those scoring high on neuroticism favored informational non-comparative and transformational comparative ads. However, openness was not related to any of the ad strategies. Research should continue to investigate the relationship between the more affective components of the personality dimensions and their relationship with ad strategy. In addition, the creativity and quality of an advertisement could be what attracts individuals with higher levels of openness to experience.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Vu, Kim-Phuong
Commitee: Miles, Jim, Hancock, Gabriella
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Psychology
Keywords: Advertising, Big Five, Human factors, Individuation, Marketing, Personality
Publication Number: 22583586
ISBN: 9781088321959
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