Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Digital Otaku: Anime, Participatory Culture, and Desire
by Garner, Katelin, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 97; 22588029
Abstract (Summary)

Amid the growing wealth of digital technologies and social media platforms across the web, eclectic groups of fan communities have cultivated intricate networks in the emerging apparatus of electracy to participate in the composition and distribution of fan works. Drawing from Gregory Ulmer’s theory of heuretics and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s philosophical conception of desiring-production, this thesis contends that Otaku Culture, the fan community dedicated to the consumption of Japanese animation, models the inventive video practices of electracy by engaging, mediating, and translating cultural texts. Insights from Sarah Arroyo, who analyzes participatory video culture, and Jan Rune Holmevik, who examines “play” as a conductor for invention, help contextualize otaku as ludic agents in a choric environment. Neatly fulfilling Henry Jenkins’ definition of a participatory culture, Otaku Culture consists of a global community in which a shared appreciation for animated media drives the formation of transnational identities and collaborative electrate production.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Arroyo, Sarah J
Commitee: Scenters-Zapico, John, Carter, Geoffrey V
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: English
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/4(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: British and Irish literature, Technical Communication, Philosophy
Keywords: Electracy, Ludology, Networked Communities, Otaku Culture, Participatory Culture, YouTube
Publication Number: 22588029
ISBN: 9781687913500
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