Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Maternal Mindful Disposition, Alpha Amylase, Cortisol, and Perceived Stress: A Longitudinal Analysis of Maternal and Infant Stress Levels
by Silke, Olivia Marie, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 108; 13901231
Abstract (Summary)

Prenatal stress is linked with negative health outcomes. Maternal mindful disposition, one’s ability to maintain “present-moment-awareness”, may attenuate prenatal stress effects. This study investigated whether higher maternal mindful disposition would be associated with lower maternal pre- and postnatal stress and infant stress at postpartum. Our sample consisted of 100 pregnant women who were identified as being low or high in mindful disposition at baseline (< 19 weeks of gestation) and whose stress levels (alpha amylase, cortisol, perceived stress) were assessed throughout pregnancy and at three months postpartum; infant stress levels (alpha amylase, cortisol, perceived stress) were assessed at postpartum. Results indicated that higher maternal mindful disposition was associated with lower maternal perceived stress, but not maternal biological stress (alpha amylase, cortisol) or infant stress measures. This research may contribute to a greater understanding of how mindful disposition could mitigate negative health outcomes associated with perceived stress in low-income mothers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Urizar, Guido
Commitee: Pedersen, William, Treesukosol, Yada, Boehm, Julia
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/3(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biochemistry, Physiological psychology, Obstetrics
Keywords: Alpha amylase, Cortisol, Infant, Mindful disposition, Pregnancy, Stress
Publication Number: 13901231
ISBN: 9781088301548
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