Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Relationship of Reading Instruction Using Comprehension Strategies for Expository Texts to the Academic Achievement of Elementary Students
by Weise, Patricia W., Ph.D., Notre Dame of Maryland University, 2019, 140; 13901379
Abstract (Summary)

Students in the United States struggle with comprehension when reading, especially when reading expository text. Research has shown that good readers are strategic readers and comprehension strategies can be taught to all students. Yet many observational studies have found very little comprehension instruction occurring in elementary classrooms. This study was designed to identify the amount of time teachers in the United States and other English-speaking countries ask students to use comprehension strategies identified in the 2016 PIRLS Teacher Questionnaire. This researcher hoped to find out how often fourth-grade teachers teach comprehension strategies necessary for comprehending narrative and expository texts and whether a relationship exists between the teaching of comprehension strategies and reading expository test scores on PIRLS for fourth-grade students in the United States and other English-speaking countries By using the data collected during the 2016 PIRLS administration on the Teacher Questionnaire, a frequency distribution was run for the United States, Ireland, Northern Ireland, England, Australia, and Trinidad and Tobago. A regression analysis was run to compare the frequency of comprehension strategy use and fourth-grade student scores on the expository test section. Results showed a small relationship between the comprehension strategy “locate information within the text” and expository test scores for all English-speaking countries. Negative relationships were found with the strategies “make predictions about what will happen next in the text they are reading” and “describe the style or structure of the text they have read.” The results indicate that more teachers are teaching comprehension strategies with “locate information within the text” contributing to student comprehension when reading expository text. The comprehension strategies “make predictions about what will happen next in the text they are reading” and “describe the style or structure of the text they have read” indicated a significant negative relationship, which may have resulted from incorrect teacher instruction of the strategies or students’ inability to know when, why, and how to apply those strategies when reading nonfiction text.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Martin, Dawn Jacobs
Commitee: Fenster, Mark
School: Notre Dame of Maryland University
Department: Department of Education
School Location: United States -- Maryland
Source: DAI-A 81/3(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Reading instruction, Elementary education
Keywords: Comprehension, Instruction, PIRLS, Reading, Strategies
Publication Number: 13901379
ISBN: 9781085798495
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