Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Video Games as Prosocial Playgrounds for Adolescents with ASD
by Rolston, Brittany, M.S., Minot State University, 2019, 73; 13883235
Abstract (Summary)

The effects of playing prosocial video games on the social skills of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were explored. The research was grounded in social learning theory, and sought to explore the viability of using a video game avatar as a model for adolescents with ASD, specifically in terms of expanding their social skill set. Four participants and their families were selected to be the research population, and biweekly interviews were conducted for an eight week exposure period, during which the participants played a prosocial video game of choice. Data was collected and analyzed qualitatively, and it was found that participants and their

families predominantly enjoyed the modality of learning through video games, using more positive language, than negative. Additionally, it was found that the participants used more prosocial language, and less antisocial language during the interviews, and there was evidence of emerging secondary social effects (e.g., reduced social anxiety, increased social initiations, etc.). Participants were seen to vary in their “mental social settings” when replying to questions about social experiences, and based on these results, a twofold process of social skill expansion through the medium of video games has been identified: “in game” social learning happens first, which can then be followed by “real life” social practice.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Borisinkoff, Evan
Commitee: Askvig, Brent, Borden-King, Lisa
School: Minot State University
Department: Science Education
School Location: United States -- North Dakota
Source: MAI 81/2(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Special education, Disability studies, Educational technology
Keywords: ASD, Autism, Games, Prosocial, Social, Video
Publication Number: 13883235
ISBN: 9781085655187
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