Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

College Student Engagement in Online Learning
by Mucundanyi, Gaspard, Ph.D., New Mexico State University, 2019, 148; 22588786
Abstract (Summary)

Student engagement is one of the factors for determining the quality and retention of online education. Student engagement is also essential to student learning and success in online courses. This quantitative study used the online community and engagement scale survey to examine student engagement in three types of interactions, student-student, student-content, and student-instructor in undergraduate and graduate online courses. The MANOVA results indicated differences in engagement between graduate and undergraduate students; Wilks’ Lambda, F (3,155) = .9, p = .0008. The follow-up ANOVAs showed that graduate students were more engaged amongst themselves (F (1,157) = 16.38, p = .0001, as well as with content, F (1,157) = 9.39, p = .0001) than undergraduate students. The factorial analysis findings highlighted the contributing factors to student-instructor, student-student, and student-content interactions. Further, there was no statistically significant difference in engagement between international and domestic students in online courses. However, international students tended to engage more than domestic students. This study provides guidelines that may assist instructional designers and online instructors in developing and teaching engaging online courses.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Woodley, Xeturah M.
Commitee: Rutledge, David, Parra, Julia, Gard, Charlotte
School: New Mexico State University
Department: Curriculum and Instruction
School Location: United States -- New Mexico
Source: DAI-A 81/2(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational technology, Higher education
Keywords: Distance education, Online education, Student-content interaction, Student engagement, Student-instructor interaction, Student-student interaction
Publication Number: 22588786
ISBN: 9781085653114
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