Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Employees Workplace Disclosure: An Investigation on How the Fear of Stigmatization, Organizational Contexts, and State Legal Protections Influence the Disclosure Decision
by Kast, Erik T., Psy.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2019, 71; 13898204
Abstract (Summary)

This quantitative research examined how the supportiveness or unsupportiveness organizational contexts, the presence or absence of state employment legal protections, and the fear of having a stigmatized identity can influence the decision of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) employees to disclose or not disclose their sexual orientation or gender identity at work. This study examined data collected from 272 individuals who were over the age of 18, worked in the United States, and identified as LGBT. The findings suggest that the more favorable an organizations climate and culture are may reduce the level of fear that LGBT individuals associate with their LGBT identity. Additionally, supportive organizational contexts may have stronger influence on the decision to disclose than the presence or absence of state level employment protection laws. These findings are significant as they indicate that the supportiveness or unsupportiveness of the workplace may be more important to LGBT employees when deciding to disclose their sexual orientation or gender identity than having legal protections.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Barr, Micheal
Commitee: Aguilar, Alex, Michalski, Daniel
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: Business Psychology: Consulting Track
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-A 81/2(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: LGBTQ studies, Organizational behavior, Occupational psychology
Keywords: Fear of stigmatization, LGBT, Organizational contexts, Perceived organizational support, State employment protections, Workplace disclosure
Publication Number: 13898204
ISBN: 9781085610568
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