Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Prevention and Intervention Programs that Aim at Reducing Problem Behaviors among School-Age Children: A Systematic Review of Literature
by Pascual, Blandy, M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 77; 13812970
Abstract (Summary)

Behavior problems among school-age children have short and long-term detrimental outcomes in their emotional, behavioral, and academic functioning. Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law, children identified to have a disability that impedes their learning capacity are eligible to receive specialized instructions designed to meet the unique needs and reduce any display of behavior problems. However, not all students that display a behavior problem are eligible to receive supportive services under these mandates. This systematic review of literature explored prevention and intervention programs that aim at reducing problem behaviors among school-age children that do not have an emotional and behavioral diagnosis. Future implications of unaddressed problem behaviors that emerge in school-age years were also explored since unaddressed problem behaviors can lead to risky behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. Two different types of intervention models were explored: interventions that focus on single domains and integrated model interventions. Implications for social work and cultural relevance in social work regarding practice, future research and social policy for school-age children with problem behaviors were also discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lam, Brian
Commitee: Brocato, Jo, Campbell, Venetta
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work, School of
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work
Keywords:
Publication Number: 13812970
ISBN: 9781085570268
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