Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Social Services for the Islamic Center of South Bay: A Grant Project
by Mirza, Mubeena, M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 54; 13813299
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this project was to locate a potential funding source and write a grant to create a social services program at the Islamic Center of South Bay. A thorough literature review was conducted to better understand the needs of Muslims in the United States of America. In the literature review, risk factors, barriers, and protective factors were identified. A search was performed in order to determine an appropriate funding source for the social services project. The chosen funder was the Ford Foundation whose mission is to alleviate poverty and social injustices. The goal of this program is to meet the needs of the Muslim-American population in the South Bay-Los Angeles area. It will do so by providing an array of social services to the Muslims in the community, and it will be located within the Islamic Center of South Bay-LA. Services will include mental health treatment and case management including linkage to employment services, legal aid, and housing assistance. The program will be evaluated after a year through surveys to clients and members of the community. If funded, this program will help to uplift individuals within the Muslim community. Actual submission of the grant application was not a requirement for the completion of this thesis project.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brocato, Jo
Commitee: Campbell, Venetta, Lam, Brian
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work, School of
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, Ethnic studies
Keywords: Grant, Islam, Mosque, Muslim, Muslim-American, Social services
Publication Number: 13813299
ISBN: 9781085570145
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