Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Asian American Health Disparities: A Quantitative Study
by Ilagan, Brian, M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 76; 13814820
Abstract (Summary)

The study used secondary data from the 2016 California Health Interview Survey to examine the relationship among Asian American subgroups and health characteristics (e.g. general health, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, asthma, and smoking) and the various sociodemographic characteristics among the Asian American subgroups (e.g. nativity, gender, age, income, education, and English fluency) and health characteristics. The sample consisted of Chinese (n =465), Filipino (n =326), Japanese (n =489), Korean, (n =326), and Vietnamese (n =388). The study found that there were differences among the Asian American subgroups, such as Vietnamese reported poorer health, Japanese more diabetes and hypertension, and Filipinos reported more obesity. Asian Americans immigrants reported poorer health than their U.S.-born counterparts; men were usually associated with poorer health than women, and health declined with age. Lower income was usually associated with poorer health, diabetes, and hypertension with most subgroups, and poor English was associated with poor health, diabetes, and hypertension with most subgroups. Asian Americans are not a monolithic group; each subgroup of Asian Americans have distinct characteristics and different health needs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Santhiveeran, Janaki
Commitee: Kim, Mimi, Ranney, Molly
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work, School of
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, Asian American Studies
Keywords: Asian American, Chronic disease, Disparity, Health, Quantitative, Racial and ethnic disparities
Publication Number: 13814820
ISBN: 9781085564762
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest