Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Animal-Assisted Therapy and Attention-Deficit Hyperactity Disorder Youth Program: A Grant Proposal
by Valley-Damkoehler, Aimee Dorothy, M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2019, 66; 13859435
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this project was to locate a potential funding source and write a grant to provide an Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) program as an effective resource to alleviate the core symptoms of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) for children in public school. These children, with ADHD would be transported weekly to a local farm for a 1-hour program involving interactions with animals. The goals would be to enhance the children’s care and empathy for animals; increase their self-confidence; bring greater awareness of personal boundaries; and improve prosocial skills, active listening skills, and patience in social settings.


An extensive literature review was performed to investigate the best way to alleviate symptoms of ADHD in children. Biophilia and Attachment theory were used as theoretical frameworks and evidence-based AAT interventions were discussed.


The Human-Animal Bond Research Institute was chosen as the potential funder due to its commitment to evidence-based practices accentuating the positive bond between humans and animals. The prospective host agency would be Forget Me Not Farm in Santa Rosa, California, a therapeutic animal farm.


The actual submission of the grant application was not a requirement of the thesis project.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Potts, Marilyn
Commitee: Pasztor, Eileen, Wilson, Steve
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work, School of
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 81/1(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work, Animal sciences, Psychology
Keywords: AAT, ADHD, Animal-Assisted Therapy, Attachment Theory, Biophilia, Education
Publication Number: 13859435
ISBN: 9781085558129
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