Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Art of Apology: Taking Responsibility for One's Actions and Requesting Forgiveness in the Workplace
by Faber, Brittany, M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2019, 58; 13863864
Abstract (Summary)

Apologies in the workplace have been examined in research only minimally. There are still many questions surrounding what makes an apology effective, and it is unclear what factors in the environment contribute to their effectiveness. The research that does exist has repeatedly revealed taking responsibility for one’s actions as an important component of apologies. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine if taking responsibility and a request for forgiveness influence the perceptions of those receiving the apology in terms of trustworthiness of the transgressor, sincerity of apology, and expectations for future work relationships. Participants were 200 individuals recruited through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. After reading a scenario in which a transgression occurs, participants responded to surveys of perceived trustworthiness, sincerity, and expectations for a future work relationship. A 2x2 MANOVA revealed that these variables did not significantly affect participants’ perceptions; however, there was a significant negative correlation between age and sincerity perceptions. Explanations for these findings are discussed as well as opportunities for additional research and possible limitations of the study.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Daus, Catherine
Commitee: Bartels, Lynn, Love, Mary Sue
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 58/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Apologies in the workplace, Apology, Conflict in the workplace, Industrial organizational psychology, Workplace
Publication Number: 13863864
ISBN: 978-1-392-25961-0
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