Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Perceptions of Recent Veterinary Medical Graduates regarding the NAVMEC Professional Competencies as Entry-Level Employability Skills
by Perry, Ruby L., Ph.D., Keiser University, 2019, 146; 13898743
Abstract (Summary)

The need for employability skills to be taught in the veterinary medical curriculum is more critical than ever for veterinary medical graduates to increase their hiring potential. Three groups of veterinary medical graduates 1–3 years post-graduation were used to examine their familiarity with the NAVMEC professional competencies as employability skills; their perceptions on the level of preparedness as entry-level veterinarians; and if there is a difference in the level of preparedness among the three groups. Although the majority of the veterinary medical graduates in all three groups (Year 1, Year 2 and Year3) were not familiar with the NAVMEC professional competencies, they ranked 37/45 of the professional competencies or employability skills as being adequately prepared. Familiarity to the NAVMEC professional competencies relative to gender, area of employment or year of graduation was not statistically significant relative to the 45 professional competencies. There was no difference in the level of preparedness among the three groups relative to the 45 professional competencies. Thus, the graduation year was unrelated to the recent graduates’ level of preparedness.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gatewood, Kelly
Commitee: Bridgewater, Michelle, Komaroff, Eugene
School: Keiser University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: DAI-B 80/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational evaluation, Veterinary services
Keywords: AAVMC, Employability skills, NAVMEC professional competencies, NAVMEC report, Veterinary medical graduates, Veterinary medicine
Publication Number: 13898743
ISBN: 9781392267592
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