Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The author has requested that access to this graduate work be delayed until 2021-06-07. After this date, this graduate work will be available on an open access basis.
Life in the Time of Cholera: The Immediate Commercial, Bureaucratic, and Social Implications of the 1849 Epidemic on St. Louis, Missouri
by Schmidt, Kendyl M., M.A., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2019, 88; 13877567
Abstract (Summary)

The cholera epidemic of 1849 swept across the entire United States, but no place was hit harder than St. Louis, Missouri. Losing nearly 10% of its population to the deadly scourge, this burgeoning metropolis and its people were forced to reconcile how to manage the crisis at hand while maintaining their reputation as a center of prosperity. Framed by the diary entries of a young German-American entrepreneur, this research examines the commercial, municipal, and social impact cholera had on St. Louis while overturning prevailing notions that the city effectively shut down in response to the presence of the disease. While it is true that some aspects of the city ceased to function as normal, this narrative does not accurately depict the story in its entirety. Instead, the city existed as two places at once – simultaneously alive and dead, where empty streets were paved with active entrepreneurs and an active local government.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Jack, Bryan
Commitee: Stacy, Jason, Vongsathorn, Kathleen
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: History
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 58/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: American history, Public health, History
Keywords: 1849, Antebellum, Cholera, Epidemic, Public health, St. Louis
Publication Number: 13877567
ISBN: 9781392264980
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