Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Association between Air Pollution and the Prevalence of Alzheimer's Disease in Four Metropolitan Areas in the United States of America
by He, Yu, M.S., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2019, 29; 13896620
Abstract (Summary)

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States of America (USA). Air pollution is a critical environmental hazard that affects public health worldwide. A limited number of studies have examined the association between air pollution and Alzheimer’s disease. This research aimed at revealing potential connections between air pollution and Alzheimer’s disease in four metropolitan areas in the United States. Air pollution data collected from the Environmental Protection Agency database and metro-area Alzheimer’s disease data derived from state-level data were analyzed using generalized estimation equations. Our results indicated that the presence of fine particles is not associated with the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, of all six air pollutants examined, ozone concentration correlates with the increased in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. Ozone may contribute to the development of this disorder. SO2, CO, and NO2 concentration show association with the prevalence of AD. The major limitation of this study was the lack of metro-area level Alzheimer’s disease data. However, our study design offered an approach to studying air pollution exposure and AD other than sampling method. It may reveal clues of future research.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Robakis, Nikolaos K.
Commitee: Gabrilove, Janice, Moskovitz, Alan
School: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department: Clinical Research
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 58/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Public health, Epidemiology
Keywords: Air pollution, Alzheimer's disease, Metro areas
Publication Number: 13896620
ISBN: 9781392254882
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