Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

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Electronic Cigarette Juices Induce Inflammation and Morphological Changes in Cell and 3D Tissue Culture
by Snyder, Jesse, M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2019, 62; 13877710
Abstract (Summary)

Smoking is common in the United States. Cigarette smoke has been linked to inflammation and cellular damage within the oral cavity. Specifically, nicotine is known to induce an inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can become detrimental to the oral cavity and lead to further complications, such as periodontitis and tooth loss. Recently, electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) have become very popular among young people even though there is little research on how the vaporized liquids effect human cells. This lack of knowledge prevents clinicians from accurately counseling their patients. Our research using e-cig juice is beginning to shed light upon this gap in knowledge. Studies were performed with a 3D gingival epithelium model. An MTT assay was performed with tissues treated with e-cig juice, both with and without nicotine (0 or 18mg/ml). Tissue viability remained above 70% after 18 hours of continuous exposure to the e-cig juices. For cytokine analysis, tissues were exposed for 20 minutes to e-cig juice with or without nicotine. After exposure, tissues were washed with PBS then incubated with normal medium for 4, 24, and 48 hours. Tissues under both conditions showed an increase in IL-8 and IL-1β production at 24 and 48 hours post-treatment. Tissues were also shown to express toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in e-cig treatment media. In addition, human gingival fibroblasts and primary gingival epithelial cells were exposed to varying concentrations of e-cig juice, with or without nicotine, and photographed at various time points to evaluate morphological changes. Rapid changes in the morphology of both fibroblasts and epithelial cells were observed. Our initial studies indicate that oral cells may be adversely affected by exposure to e-cig juices and further study is required to provide useable information for clinicians.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: McCracken, Barbara
Commitee: Fowler, Tom, Krajniak, Kevin
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Biological Sciences
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 58/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biology, Cellular biology, Toxicology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 13877710
ISBN: 978-1-392-25613-8
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