Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Transformational and Transactional Leadership Behaviors Influence Employee Job Satisfaction Within a Federal Government Organization
by Jenner, Melissa V., D.B.A., Saint Leo University, 2019, 201; 13896034
Abstract (Summary)

Perceived leadership behaviors influence employee job satisfaction. This research compliments the empirical evidence that presents job satisfaction as having a positive correlation with both transactional and transformational leadership styles in the federal government (Asencio, 2016; Trottier, Van Wart, & Wang, 2008). Participants in this research were civil servant employees working for a federal organization in Washington, DC. The prevailing leadership style in the organization was a low to moderate form of transformational leadership. This study found that employees with leaders that demonstrated transformational behaviors expressed greater job satisfaction among the supervisory, coworkers, nature of work, and communication facets. The leadership behaviors of intellectual stimulation and contingent rewards were statistically significant predictors of employee job satisfaction. However, tenure was not a statistically significant mediating variable between leadership behaviors and job satisfaction. Overall, job satisfaction in the organization varied from moderate to high across participants ranging in tenure from zero to thirty-nine years of government service. Lastly, the supplementary analysis shows that the organization’s investment into developing leadership skills could yield increased employee job satisfaction.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moss, Kenneth
Commitee: Gold, Andrew, Lewis, Sherrie
School: Saint Leo University
Department: School of Business
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: DAI-A 80/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Public administration, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Federal government, Job satisfaction, Leadership, Transactional, Transformational
Publication Number: 13896034
ISBN: 9781392232989
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