Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Risk Factors Tied to Student Achievement: Redefining Educational Disadvantage
by Gandhi, Britney Beth, Ph.D., Northwest Nazarene University, 2019, 135; 13882957
Abstract (Summary)

Educational disadvantage has been a focus in the United States for decades. The primary factor behind educational disadvantage has been low-income level since Lyndon B Johnson’s War on Poverty in 1964. Title I funds were a result of this legislation, but over 50 years of research have indicated that the achievement gap between low-income students and their peers is not decreasing. This quantitative study explores challenges beyond low-income that affect student achievement; specifically, this study presents 19 risk factors (including low-income level) that impact student learning. The research analyzes a school district’s upper elementary students in Colorado and the achievement results from the 2017-2018 state assessment. Using statistical analyses including correlation and regression analyses, the study determines relationships between risk factors and student achievement. The results indicated that eight risk factors had an impact on student achievement including special education, free/reduced lunch, African American or Hispanic, English Language Learner, teacher turnover, mobility rate, new principal, and teacher vacancy. The study found that educational disadvantage should be determined by a variety of risk factors and not the single factor of family low-income rate.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sanchez, LoriAnn
Commitee: Adams, Sherry Ann, Birhanzel, Wendy
School: Northwest Nazarene University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Idaho
Source: DAI-A 80/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational sociology, Educational leadership
Keywords: Colorado, Correlation analysis, Educational disadvantage, Regression analysis, Risk factors, Student achievement
Publication Number: 13882957
ISBN: 9781392194805
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