Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

U.S. Missile Defense Cooperation with the Czech Republic: Alliance Politics in Action
by Dodge, Michaela, Ph.D., George Mason University, 2019, 233; 13813109
Abstract (Summary)

The dissertation identifies factors that contribute to alliance cooperation between allies that have asymmetrical capabilities. The dissertation focuses on a broader question of why countries cooperate on defense-related matters despite gaining asymmetric benefits. The dissertation contributes to the field of alliance management, politics, and international cooperation in general. Utilizing a case study approach, the dissertation analyzes the Czech-U.S. missile defense cooperation after the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABM Treaty) in 2002. How does international cooperation occur between allies with asymmetric diplomatic, military, and economic capabilities is a critical question particularly relevant in today’s multi-polar environment dominated by the United States. Uncovering factors that foster or hamper such cooperation is policy relevant because countries have limited resources and therefore need to allocate them in a manner that provides them with the largest pay off. The dissertation finds that defense cooperation between two countries can result in same outcomes as if their threat perceptions were the same even when they differ. It also highlights the role and influence of domestic politics.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Colin, Dueck
Commitee: Katz, Mark N., Rhodes, Edward
School: George Mason University
Department: Political Science
School Location: United States -- Virginia
Source: DAI-A 80/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: International Relations, Political science
Keywords: Alliance cooperation, Alliance politics, Czech Republic, International cooperation, Missile defense
Publication Number: 13813109
ISBN: 978-1-392-21011-6
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