Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Using Scripture as Affirmations to Promote Positive Religious Coping, Secure Attachment, and Posttraumatic Growth in Christian Clients in Psychotherapy
by Smith, Diane, M.S.W., Southern Connecticut State University, 2019, 58; 13865403
Abstract (Summary)

The present study explores the possibility of mental health clinicians using affirmations drawn from biblical scripture to promote positive religious coping and posttraumatic growth in Christian clients. There is much literature in recent years that shows positive relationships among secure attachment, positive religious coping, and posttraumatic growth. There is also substantial research on how mental health professionals can ethically and sensitively incorporate religion and spirituality into psychotherapy with religious clients. However, there is little literature on how clinicians can help transform a client's negative religious coping to positive religious coping. Object relations theory posits the corrective emotional experience that occurs in therapy may help some individuals with insecure attachments develop secure attachments. Furthermore, the use of mantrams and affirmations has been shown to decrease posttraumatic stress symptoms in various client populations. I theorize that in the holding environment of therapy, the clinician can help guide a Christian client with negative religious coping and/or insecure attachment to God to develop positive religious coping and secure attachment to God. Using scriptures as affirmations may facilitate this process.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Schneider, Dana A.
Commitee:
School: Southern Connecticut State University
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- Connecticut
Source: MAI 58/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Therapy, Social work, Clinical psychology, Spirituality
Keywords: Affirmation, Christianity, Post traumatic growth, Psychotherapy, Religious coping, Scripture
Publication Number: 13865403
ISBN: 978-1-392-16955-1
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