Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Restorative Justice Juvenile Diversion and Recidivism: A Quantitative Assessment
by Brown, Nancy T., Ph.D., Capella University, 2018, 128; 13425654
Abstract (Summary)

Juvenile recidivism rates are the most widely used measure for diversion programs’ effectiveness. Youth redirected to diversion programming report lower recidivism rates than youth detained in the traditional juvenile justice system. The purpose of this study extends existing research on restorative justice (RJ) juvenile diversion programming and recidivism. Labeling theory provides the theoretical framework for the research questions and selected variables. Research questions include: What is the relationship between the duration of time minors spend in RJ juvenile diversion programming and recidivism? What is the relationship between ethnicity of a minor participating in RJ juvenile diversion programming and recidivism?

What is the relationship between age of minor participating in RJ juvenile diversion programming and recidivism? What is the relationship between prior offense(s) of minor participating in RJ juvenile diversion programming and recidivism? What is the relationship between type of current offense(s) of a minor participating in RJ juvenile diversion programming and recidivism? Quantitative analysis evaluates the relationship between time in diversion, age, ethnicity, prior offense(s), type of current offense(s), and recidivism. The study employs an analysis of central tendency, correlation, and logistic regression. The study samples 199 closed cases of pre-adjudicated youth who participated and completed RJ diversion programming and six-month follow-up period. Participants were 11–18 years old with 76.4% between 13–16 years old. Seventy-six percent of minors were persons of color (African American and Hispanic) with 74% males. Sixty-eight percent of the participants averaged six months in restorative justice diversion programming. The results revealed an overall recidivism rate of 15.6% for participants with a mean of 210.49 (SD = 65.71) days in programming resulting in no significant relationship between time in diversion programming and recidivism. Statistical analysis also found age, ethnicity, and type of current offense were not significant in predicting recidivism. Prior offense was significant in predicting recidivism. The results align with previous literature indicating diversion programming is associated with lower rates of recidivism and that past criminal behavior is predictive of future criminal behavior.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Rounds-Bryant, Jennifer
Commitee: Carter, Kay, Russ-Trent, Lana
School: Capella University
Department: Public Service Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 80/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Sociology, Criminology
Keywords: Juvenile diversion, Recidivism, Restorative justice
Publication Number: 13425654
ISBN: 9781392155813
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest