Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Complexities of Clery Act Reporting Requirements as Related to Non-Compliance: Perceptions of Compliance Officials at Midwest Higher Education Institutions
by Kenny, William R., Ed.D., Lindenwood University, 2019, 173; 13863462
Abstract (Summary)

Violent crimes and sexual assaults on higher education campuses in the United States has been an ongoing for decades. In 1990, Congress enacted the Jeanne Clery Act in to enhance the safety of students by requiring higher education institutions to publish their crime statistics and security policies in the form on an Annual Security Report (Fox, Khey, Lizotte, & Nobles, 2012; Richards & Kafonek 2013). Previous research revealed the Clery Act’s many requirements are confusing and open to interpretation, which has prevented higher education institutions from maintaining compliance (Wood & Janosik, 2012).

This study investigates the complexities of Clery Act requirements as they relate to institutional non-compliance from the perspective of Clery Act compliance officials. The researcher conducted interviews with 20 Clery compliance officials and triangulated their responses with previous research and secondary data obtained in the literature review. The results identified specific information related to the complexities of Clery Act requirements and recommendations to enhance compliance. At the conclusion of the study several areas of future research were identified that could help generate additional information as to the factors that impede and enhance Clery Act compliance.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Trice, Thomas
Commitee: Winslow, Kevin, Zlatic, Joe
School: Lindenwood University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 80/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher education
Keywords: Higher education, Jeanne Clery Act, Security policies
Publication Number: 13863462
ISBN: 978-1-392-07463-3
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest