Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Influence of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Childhood Obesity in African American Children: The Role of Parental Incarceration
by Wheeler, Margaret, D.E., University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 2018, 99; 10981384
Abstract (Summary)

This dissertation explores the relationship between parental incarceration and childhood obesity in African American children by reviewing Adverse Childhood Experiences from the National Survey of Children’s Health, revealing the epidemic of childhood obesity, and examining the issues of mass incarceration and its physical, mental, and emotional effect on African American children.

The results of this study find that we could not show that being an African American child experiencing parental incarceration influences childhood obesity. In this study we could not show that the number of Adverse Childhood Experiences faced by African American children are related to the child’s level of obesity. Also, this study finds that we could not show a statistically significant relationship between African American children having incarcerated parents and the rest of the parental-incarcerated population, whites and others, and the difference in obesity. Finally, we could not show an association between obese African American children who experience parental incarceration by gender.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Fossey, William R., Dick, Steven J.
Commitee: Griggs, Dana
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Louisiana
Source: DAI-A 80/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Educational leadership, Public health, Developmental psychology, Individual & family studies
Keywords: Adverse childhood experiences, African American children, Childhood obesity, Parental incarceration
Publication Number: 10981384
ISBN: 9781392042113
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