Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Historical Oppression and Subordination of Indigenous Women: The Tz'utujil Maya of Santiago Atitlán Case Study
by Baker, Brandy Nicole, M.A., The American University of Paris (France), 2016, 108; 13871612
Abstract (Summary)

This thesis examines the social reality in which indigenous women live and work each day. The author was fully immersed in the Tz’utujil Mayan town of Santiago Atitlán in Guatemala for three months to observe and learn the various ways in which indigenous women are subordinated and oppressed. This fieldwork was an ethnographic endeavor, maintaining meticulous notes of the goings on of the town in order to draw conclusions from the cultural phenomenon of the town. The observations are then linked to the historical oppression and subordination that the Tz’utujil Maya have faced since the Conquest and focuses specifically on how that historical reality plays into the every day lives of present day Tz’utujil women. This thesis finds that the historical and present subordination and exploitation of Tz’utujil women is related to the capitalist world system and the patriarchal worldview. Indigenous women, associated with the raising of children, housework, and keepers of indigenous traditions, are considered a lower class and of lesser value than their male counterparts. This view is directly linked to the capitalist world system that holds wage laborers in higher regard than unpaid house workers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee: Cohen, James, Golub, Philip, Perry, Susan
School: The American University of Paris (France)
School Location: France
Source: MAI 58/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Latin American Studies
Keywords: Historical oppression of indigenous women, Patriarchal capitalist world system and indigenous women, Santiago Atitlan capitalist world system, Subordination of indigenous women, Tz'utujil Mayan women
Publication Number: 13871612
ISBN: 9781392037621
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