Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Internalized Homophobia and Sexual Risk-Taking Behavior: A Jungian Perspective
by Anderson, William Brantly, Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute, 2019, 283; 13815040
Abstract (Summary)

In spite of recent trends that have positively impacted gay men, the United States continues to be permeated by homophobia. This phenomenon often manifests in young gay men as internalized homophobia, which in turn can lead to psychological and physiological symptoms, including engaging in sexual practices that place them at risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The purpose of this study was to explore, from a Jungian perspective, the relationship between internalized homophobia and sexual risk-taking behavior among young gay men. Utilizing interpretive phenomenological analysis, a semistructured interview protocol was employed to elucidate from a sample of this population the relationship between internalized homophobia and sexual-risk taking behavior. The data revealed that none of the participants experienced significant internalized homophobia in either adolescence or adulthood. Furthermore, the data suggested that most of the participants did not engage in conduct that placed them at risk for acquiring HIV. Finally, the data did not evidence the existence of psychological complexes (e.g., parental, inferiority) among any of the participants. Because of the limited scope of this study, the results cannot be taken as representative of young gay men regarding their sexual identities or their sexual behavior.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Panajian, Avedis
Commitee: Phillips, Wendy, Shubert, Justin
School: Pacifica Graduate Institute
Department: Clinical Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-B 80/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Clinical psychology
Keywords: Internalized homophobia, Jung, Risky sexual behavior
Publication Number: 13815040
ISBN: 9781392040980
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest