Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Celiac Disease: Examination of Executive Function and Social Phobia Among Female College-aged Students
by Arnone, Jacqueline M., Ph.D., Kean University, 2018, 142; 10980971
Abstract (Summary)

Problem Statement: This study compares traditional age female college students (18–25) diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) to age matched controls on measurements of executive function (EF) and social phobia (SP). Although previous research in this area has been mixed, a preponderance of the evidence from these studies suggests that CD impacts cognitive functioning as a whole; executive functioning in particular. However, most of the literature in this area focuses on age groups outside of the normal traditional college age range. No research to date has examined executive functioning or social phobia among 18–25-year-old female college students with CD. Bronfenbrenner’s Bio-Ecological Systems Theory will be utilized in understanding the relationships among and between the various interacting systems with the developing person with CD.

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare traditional age female college students (18–25) diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) to age matched controls on measures of executive function and social phobia.

Research Questions: Do female college students aged 18–25 with CD differ between age-matched controls on levels of EF? Do female college students aged 18–25 years old with CD experience different levels of SP than age matched controls? Do female college students aged 18–25 with CD that are adherent to a gluten-free diet (GFD) differ on their scores on measures of EF than those participants who do not adhere to a GFD? Do female college students aged 18–25 with CD have lower GPAs than age-matched healthy controls? Do female college students aged 18–25 years old with CD that are adherent to a GFD have higher GPAs than those female college students aged 18–25 with CD, who do not adhere to a GFD?

Methodology: This study employed a quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design. The relationship between the dependent variables (DVs) EF and SP with the independent variables (IVs) participants with CD and age-matched healthy controls and the covariate variables (adherence to a GFD and GPA) will be examined using independent t-tests and between subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA). Predictor variables (IVs/covariate variables) associated with the DVs at a statistically significant level (p < .05) will be entered into the final multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).

Findings: CD significantly affected Working Memory, Planning Organization, and Organization of Materials in measures of EF among participants with CD compared to age-matched healthy controls. CD significantly affected levels of social phobia in CD participants compared to the control group in situations involving interactions with the opposite sex and interaction with strangers. Self-report GPAs among CD participants had a significantly lower mean than the control group.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Conti, Richard P.
Commitee: Rizzolo, Denise, Valas, Joan
School: Kean University
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- New Jersey
Source: DAI-B 80/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Nursing, Gender studies, Higher education
Keywords: Celiac disease, College students, Executive function, Social phobia
Publication Number: 10980971
ISBN: 978-1-392-02734-9
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