Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Differences in Myers-Briggs personality types among high school band, orchestra, and choir members
by Reardon, Christin Marie, M.M.E., Indiana University, 2009, 117; 1484428
Abstract (Summary)

This study explored personality differences among high school band, orchestra, and choir students according to ensemble membership rather than instrument played. Subjects (N = 355) were high school music students who had participated in their school’s band, orchestra, or choir for one year or more. The researcher administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to determine the personality type for each subject. The personality types were compared among the three ensembles as well as with published high school norms for the MBTI.

The results indicated that personality differences did exist among the ensembles as well as compared to MBTI norms. A significant personality difference was found between orchestra and choir students along the Extraversion-Introversion (E-I) dichotomy, indicating that choir students are more likely to be Extraverted when compared to orchestra students. While not a significant finding, band and choir students also differed on the E-I scale, with choir students again being more likely to prefer Extraversion when compared to band students. There were no significant differences between band and orchestra students. There were also no significant differences among the ensembles on the Sensing-Intuition (S-N), Thinking-Feeling (T-F), or Judging-Perceiving (J-P) scales. Compared to high school norms, the combined sample of ensemble students were significantly more likely to be Intuitive (N), Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P).

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ward-Steinman, Patrice Madura
Commitee:
School: Indiana University
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music, Music education, Educational psychology, Personality psychology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1484428
ISBN: 9781109720471
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