Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Resiliency among Secondary Teachers Serving At-Risk Populations: A Phenomenological Study
by Brooks, Lisa, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2019, 130; 13426536
Abstract (Summary)

This phenomenological study sought to understand the experiences, perceptions, and behaviors of resilient secondary educators working with at-risk populations and contrast the lived experiences of resilient teachers with those of burned out teachers. The purpose of this study is to glean common themes and attributes of resilient teachers working in high-stress environments which will help current and future teachers and administrators combat workplace stressors and teacher burnout by understanding coping skills and/or modifying behaviors and mindsets.

Secondary educators of at-risk populations have an almost impossible job educating adolescents. The vocation is filled with stressors: increased amounts of paper-work, lack of administrative support, high-stakes testing, un-manageable students. These stressors cause many teachers to experience burnout and/or leave the profession (Brackett, Palomera, Mojsa-Kaja, Reyes, & Salovey, 2010). However, within schools, there are those resilient teachers who continue to remain positive elements of the school culture and educate students (Albrecht, Johns, Mounsteven, & Olorunda, 2009). This investigation strove to understand the commonalities of these teachers and the potential to bring that knowledge to the professional lives of their peers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hamilton, Eric
Commitee: Johnson, Nicole, Leigh, Doug
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 80/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Teacher education, Secondary education, Occupational psychology
Keywords: Teacher burnout, Teacher resilience, Teacher resiliency
Publication Number: 13426536
ISBN: 9780438808935
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