Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Community Policing and the Public's Perception of Police Misconduct
by Wintruba, Shannon V., Ph.D., Capella University, 2018, 134; 10978963
Abstract (Summary)

The influence of sociodemographic characteristics, level of contact with the police, perceptions of police effectiveness, willingness to partner with police and community engagement on a citizen's perceptions of police fairness, police professionalism, police legitimacy, and police satisfaction were investigated in this study. A quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational design was used for this research study. The sample (n = 152) consisted of adults within a large metropolitan city located in the Northeast section of the United States and was determined by using a multistage cluster sample. Data was collected over a three-month period using a 42-question Likert-type survey that was distributed via door-to-door canvassing. This took place across two police zones, each encompassing 13-15 socially-diverse neighborhoods of the Northeastern city. The data was analyzed using a multiple linear regression, which indicated a significant positive relationship between the public’s perception of police effectiveness and their perception of fairness, professionalism, legitimacy, and satisfaction. However, for police contact, there was a significant negative relationship between when an individual’s immediate family member had indirect police contact and an individual’s perception of professionalism and satisfaction.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moran, Nathan
Commitee: Leerburger, Marian, Schneider, Jeffrey
School: Capella University
Department: Public Service Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 80/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Law enforcement
Keywords: Community policing, Police misconduct, Procedural justice, Public perception, Quantitative
Publication Number: 10978963
ISBN: 978-0-438-80211-7
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