Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A Mixed Methods Study of why Black Educators Stay in K-12 Publicly Funded Schools
by Alston, Jamar L., Ph.D., Neumann University, 2018, 310; 13836062
Abstract (Summary)

This mixed methods study examined why Black teachers and principals stayed in publicly funded K-12 schools after five or more years of teaching or supervising schools. The participants for this study were 37 Black teachers and 16 Black principals from Delaware, Chester, Montgomery, Berks, Philadelphia counties in Pennsylvania, and New Castle County in the state of Delaware. The quantitative data came from survey data that were slightly modified for the teacher and principal participants. The qualitative data came from semi-structured interviews. The theory informing this study was Maslow’s (1954) theory of motivation with insights from critical race theory (CRT).

This study had several findings for both the teacher and principal participants. The study found that Black teachers and principals stayed in the profession because of their students, being involved in their communities, and needing and receiving support. The participants stayed in the profession when they perceived they had made a difference in their students’ lives and became their role models. They also were involved in their communities by serving as teachers, principals, or in upper administration. The participants expressed the importance of being actively involved and establishing positive relationships with their students’ parents. The teacher and principal participants discussed receiving and giving support through mentoring, recruiting and increasing the number of Blacks in the profession, being resilient against discrimination, and receiving an adequate salary. The principals discussed their legacies that included stepping aside to make room for other educators when they retired while the teachers expressed sharing their family values to their students. Teachers reported heavy workload or uneven work distribution from their principals, as reasons for them and others leaving the profession. Principals perceived that some educators left the profession for child rearing purposes.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor:
Commitee:
School: Neumann University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 80/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Education
Keywords: Black principals, Black teachers, Publicly funded k-12 schools, Recruiting, Retention
Publication Number: 13836062
ISBN: 978-0-438-83198-8
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