Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Land Reform and Thailand's Socio-Economic Development
by Srirattanan, Jaratphong, M.A., The American University of Paris (France), 2015, 87; 13833853
Abstract (Summary)

The Northeast Asian countries1 are widely credited for being able to developed to be the world most equal economies. Over the past four to five decades, they have promoted economic growth, together with significant improvement of living standards. An important reason behind the Asian economic miracle is the ability of the governments of Japan, Republic of Korea and Taiwan SAR— to implement the region’s most successful land reform schemes. Systematic and broad land distribution programs provide not only better standards of living for their citizens— but also pave the way for the industrialization process.

With the success stories of the Northeast Asian countries, many observers expected that the Asian miracle would be replicated by a group of newly industrializing economies (NIEs) namely, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. However, various evidences have shown that the legacy of the East Asian economic miracle has not been successfully continued in the Southeastern part of the region (with the exception of Singapore and Malaysia, in certain dimensions). Thailand, in this regard, has experienced years of two-digit growth, which led to an improvement of overall economy and impressive reductions of poverty. However, unlike its Northeast Asian counterparts, inequality rate has rose in conjunction with the economic development. Table 1 shows that income gaps have grown since the country began to develop economically, in the 1960s.The Northeast Asian countries1 are widely credited for being able to developed to be the world most equal economies. Over the past four to five decades, they have promoted economic growth, together with significant improvement of living standards. An important reason behind the Asian economic miracle is the ability of the governments of Japan, Republic of Korea and Taiwan SAR— to implement the region’s most successful land reform schemes. Systematic and broad land distribution programs provide not only better standards of living for their citizens— but also pave the way for the industrialization process. With the success stories of the Northeast Asian countries, many observers expected that the Asian miracle would be replicated by a group of newly industrializing economies (NIEs) namely, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. However, various evidences have shown that the legacy of the East Asian economic miracle has not been successfully continued in the Southeastern part of the region (with the exception of Singapore and Malaysia, in certain dimensions). Thailand, in this regard, has experienced years of two-digit growth, which led to an improvement of overall economy and impressive reductions of poverty. However, unlike its Northeast Asian counterparts, inequality rate has rose in conjunction with the economic development. Table 1 shows that income gaps have grown since the country began to develop economically, in the 1960s.

The question of what has been missing from Thailand’s developmental process— is, therefore, an extremely interesting point to be investigated. Among other various differences, Thailand’s inability to implement nationwide land distribution scheme marks a possible explanation for this question. Therefore, my hypothesis is that Thailand’s inability to reduce inequality rate and replicate the East Asian success stories— lay in its inability to promote successful land reform program.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Golub, Philip
Commitee:
School: The American University of Paris (France)
Department: International Affairs
School Location: France
Source: MAI 58/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian Studies, Economics, International Relations
Keywords:
Publication Number: 13833853
ISBN: 978-0-438-79605-8
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