Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Determination of Salient Design Elements through Eye Movements, Aesthetics, and Usability
by Asuncion, Bryan C., Ph.D., Mississippi State University, 2018, 216; 10979596
Abstract (Summary)

The goal of study 1 was to use a remote eye tracker to understand how eye movements change with 7 geometrically varied remote controls to determine design element saliency. 20 participants were used to measure the following eye metrics: number of fixations prior to first fixation of any AOI, time to first fixation of an AOI, number of fixations on an AOI, dwell time of the first fixation on an AOI, total dwell time of an AOI, and the percentage of time spent on an AOI. The results of the study showed that all participants spent between 75–85% of their time fixated on the button layout which was not defined as an AOI. No statistical differences were found in the values measured for all eye tracking metrics across similarly defined AOIs. In study 2, the objective was to determine attitudes towards appearance and usability of the 7 remote control designs using the participants from study 1. Participants were asked to rate their attitudes and preferences, using a Likert-based questionnaire, about the qualities of appearance and usability for the attributes of proportion, shape, and configuration. They were asked open-ended questions about their likes and dislikes regarding the qualities of appearance and usability. Lastly, participants were given a pairwise comparison survey where they chose their preferred remote design, based on appearance, for 10 paired sets of contrasting remote designs. The hourglass subjacent and hourglass round designs were rated highest for appearance and usability from the Likert questionnaire. The hourglass round design was ranked highest for the pairwise comparison survey. For study 3, the goal was to determine attitudes towards appearance and usability of the 7 remote designs with online participants. 300 participants were asked to rate their attitudes and preferences using the same Likert-based questionnaire from study 2. They were asked the same open-ended questions and administered the same pairwise comparison survey as in study 2. The results of the Likert questionnaire showed that the hourglass subjacent and hourglass round designs were rated highest for appearance and usability. From the pairwise comparison survey, the hourglass round design was ranked the highest.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Strawderman, Lesley
Commitee: Bullington, Stanley F., Burch, Reuben F., Garrison, Teena M.
School: Mississippi State University
Department: Industrial and Systems Engineering
School Location: United States -- Mississippi
Source: DAI-B 80/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Industrial engineering, Mechanical engineering, Cognitive psychology
Keywords: Consumer electronics, Ergonomics, Eye tracker, Human computer interface, Product design, User experience
Publication Number: 10979596
ISBN: 978-0-438-75918-3
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