Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Kindergarten Teachers' Lived Experiences Regarding Classroom Assessment: A Phenomenological Study
by Desoto-Strickland, Kathleen, Ph.D., New Mexico State University, 2018, 121; 11009982
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of four state licensed kindergarten teachers with regard to classroom assessment. The purpose of the inquiry was to gain understanding of classroom assessment and its intersection with teacher's practices. The study question was, "What are the lived experiences of state licensed kindergarten teachers with regard to classroom assessment?" A critical theory theoretical framework structured and guided the study.

• Using the reduction methods as suggested by Van Manen (2014) allowed the researcher to enter a space of openness and understand the teachers' lived experiences with classroom assessment practices. The use of this phenomenological process resulted in the unveiling of four major themes teacher agency, the absence of developmentally appropriate practice, teachers feelings/knowing of assessment and the damage from early childhood assessment.

Research on early childhood education assessment and teacher practice is a timely endeavor as more children enter schools, daycares, or other means of childcare. Policy makers just like early childhood "creators" of assessment tools need to be mindful of the children first; and acknowledge and understand the place that children and teachers hold when they are making decisions of such importance.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Reyes, Loui
Commitee:
School: New Mexico State University
School Location: United States -- New Mexico
Source: DAI-A 80/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Education, Early childhood education
Keywords: Assessment, Classroom Assessment, Early Childhood Assessment, Teacher Perceptions
Publication Number: 11009982
ISBN: 9780438637368
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