Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Patterns of Collaboration between Indigenous and Nonindigenous Mexican Children
by Salgado, Bryan, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 46; 10839687
Abstract (Summary)

This study investigated the patterns of collaboration and communication related to maternal educational attainment and familiarity with Learning by Observing and Pitching In (LOPI) among Indigenous children whose mothers had 9 years or less of schooling, Indigenous children whose mothers had 12 years or more of schooling, and middle-class Mexican children. Study participants were 256 children who participated in groups of four. The children played a computer game called “Marble Blast” on two computers and were videotaped to see how they collaborated and communicated within their groups. Indigenous children whose mothers had 9 years or less of schooling were more likely to engage in collaborative behaviors in which the entire group worked as a unit to accomplish the objective of the game as opposed to the other groups. They were also more likely to engage in varied forms of communication as opposed to middle-class Mexican children who were more likely to both collaborate and communicate exclusively verbally. These findings are consistent with research showing that greater familiarity with Indigenous practices leads to more collaboration and varied forms of communication as opposed to more reliance on verbal communication which is seen in communities less familiar with Indigenous practices or non-Indigenous communities with an extensive history in Western schooling.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Correa-Chavez, Maricela
Commitee: Kohfeldt, Danielle, Ruvalcaba, Omar
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Latin American Studies, Psychology
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10839687
ISBN: 9780438538832
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