Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Optimization of a Preconception E-intervention for Marijuana Use
by Graham, Amy E., M.A., Wayne State University, 2018, 73; 10931721
Abstract (Summary)

Introduction: Preconception interventions targeting substance use as well as effective contraception are important to improve the health of both the mother and her offspring, or to reduce unintended pregnancies. Computer-delivered interventions have been shown to be effective in the reducing the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. However, little is known about the effect of specific computer-delivered intervention components and if/how they contribute to the desired intervention outcome. This study experimentally evaluated the contribution of two common intervention factors (empathy and video) of a motivational e-intervention for marijuana and contraception use.

Methods: One hundred sixty-six females who reported using marijuana in the last 6 months and having intercourse without reliable contraception in the last 12 months were recruited from a large urban university. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four intervention conditions: empathy, video, both empathy and video, or neither. The main and interaction effects of empathy and video on pre-post intervention change of intent to use marijuana in the next 30 days and intent to contact a physician about making an appointment to discuss contraception methods in the next 30 days was evaluated.

Results: The main effect of empathy and the main effect of video on mean change of intention to use marijuana in the next 30 days was not statistically significant, (F(1,162) = .063, p = .802, partial η2 = .000, and F(1,162) = .198, p = .657, partial η2 = .001), respectively. The main effect of empathy and the main effect of video on mean change of intention to contact a physician to schedule an appointment to discuss contraception in the next 30 days were also not statistically significant, (F(1,162) = .004, p = .987, partial η 2 = .00 and F(1,162) = .540, p = .464, partial η2 = .003), respectively. The interaction between empathy and video for both the pre-post intervention change of intention to use marijuana in the next 30 days and for pre to post intervention change of intention to contact a physician to schedule an appointment to discuss LARC in the next 30 days was not significant.

Conclusion: Continued research is needed to evaluate the contributions of empathy and video in computer-delivered intervention in order to identify and optimize the factors that contribute to the videos effect. Examining the effectiveness of specific components will contribute to a greater understanding of how behavioral health interventions can employ technology in ways that are increasingly evidence-based and optimally effective.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ondersma, Steven J.
Commitee: Grekin, Emily R., Hannigan, John H.
School: Wayne State University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Michigan
Source: MAI 58/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Clinical psychology
Keywords: E-health, Empathy, Intervention, Marijuana, Preconception, Video
Publication Number: 10931721
ISBN: 9780438509337
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