Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

From Rail Yard to Recreation: New Greenspace Governance for Achieving Environmental Justice in Los Angeles, California
by Padilla, Ilianna, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 104; 10839371
Abstract (Summary)

The thesis focuses on the City of Los Angeles’ acquisition of land at Taylor Yard, a 247-acre site located along the Los Angeles River (LAR), and plans to develop new greenspace projects on this previously industrial site. The Taylor Yard case study provides an example of the opportunities and struggles that face communities as they advocate for the creation of more greenspace within dense, urban Los Angeles. Employing a qualitative mixed methods approach based on media analysis, participant observation at meetings, survey questionnaires, and semi- structured interviews, the study analyzes the historical context, contemporary political ecology, and the socioeconomics that have played a role in the reconfiguration of Taylor Yard. The study examines how community-based organizations are changing the ways people perceive and utilize urban nature, encouraging and embracing local community involvement, and working towards achieving greenspace equity as well as perceptions and utilization of urban greenspace. Results demonstrate that environmental restoration and greenspace projects provide a means to educate and empower the community, and an opportunity for them to reshape their environment in ways that can enhance their livelihoods.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: House-Peters, Lily
Commitee: Hytrek, Gary, Laris, Paul
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Geography
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Geography
Keywords: Environmental justice, Governance, Greenspace, Los Angeles, Parks, Urban
Publication Number: 10839371
ISBN: 9780438464896
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