Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

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Geometrid Caterpillar Predation in Invasive and Native Plant Habitats
by Murphy, Monica, M.S., Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, 2018, 73; 10844552
Abstract (Summary)

L. cuneata or sericea lespedeza is an invasive species to Illinois and other parts of the U.S. Many studies have shown how L. cuneata outcompetes native plant species and how it effects grazing animals. However, few studies have been done to illustrate how lespedeza impacts undomesticated animal species in its environment. This purpose of this study is to discover if a severe infestation of L. cuneata affects predation rates on Geometrid moth larvae in a natural setting. Clay caterpillar models were used to assess probability of predation in two separate fields, one field which was dominated by native prairie plants and the other severely infested by L. cuneata. Data analysis found no significant difference on predation between the two fields. Therefore, the evidence from this study supports that L. cuneata invasions does not influence predation rates on Geometrid moth larvae.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brunkow, Paul E.
Commitee: Lin, Zhi-Qing, Williams, Jake B.
School: Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Department: Environmental Sciences
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Environmental science
Keywords:
Publication Number: 10844552
ISBN: 978-0-438-37901-5
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