Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Urban Coyote (Canis latrans) Ecology: Diet, Activity, and Habitat Use
by Collins, Rita, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 72; 10826343
Abstract (Summary)

Non-habituated coyotes (Canis latrans) avoid direct interactions with humans. Reliance on human food sources has been linked to gradual habituation, a precursor to conflict and attacks on domestic pets and humans. Diet and activity patterns of urban coyotes inhabiting natural fragments in Long Beach, CA were monitored through scat collection and camera trapping over a year (Aug 2016 – Aug 2017). Local urban coyotes are relying predominately on natural foods, with an increase in mammalian prey in the wet season and an increase in vegetation and insect consumption in the dry season. Anthropogenic items, food and food related inedible items, appeared in 14% of scats overall, with no significant seasonal change. Cat remains were found in 14% of scat samples, but only triggered cameras once throughout the 2,857 camera nights of the study. Coyote activity was centered on nights in both seasons, with greater dawn activity in the dry season, indicating an avoidance of peak human activity. This reliance on natural foods and avoidance of human activity reduces the opportunities for human-wildlife conflicts in our local area.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stankowich, Theodore
Commitee: Carter, Ashley, Coss, Richard, Whitcraft, Christine
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Biological Sciences
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Wildlife Management, Biology, Ecology
Keywords: Activity, Coyote, Diet, Human wildlife conflict, Urban wildlife
Publication Number: 10826343
ISBN: 9780438358492
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