Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An Examination of Self-Identity, Sense of Connection, and Membership of Individuals with Native American Ancestry
by Van Schyndel, Tamara, M.S., Pepperdine University, 2018, 78; 10749936
Abstract (Summary)

This exploratory qualitative study examined individuals’ self-identity and sense of belonging related to the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and the impacts of their tribal connection as enrolled tribal members. It was believed the greater the sense of belonging and connection, the stronger the identity and the greater the impact on the community as a whole. Eight individuals with Oneida ancestry were interviewed about their Native American ancestry and membership, participation in Oneida community, sense of connection and belonging to family and community, self-identity, and congruence with Oneida ancestry and tribal enrollment. Although participants generally did not participate in formal cultural or community activities, they reported connection and belonging to their families and ancestry and self-identified as Native American. They believed their self-identities influence their desires to give back to the community. Based on this study, the Oneida community is advised to: host tribal events related to strengthening identity and building community, develop and incorporate school-age curricula and programs that support Native American identity development, and review and revise tribal membership criteria to support the sustainability and sovereignty of the tribe.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chesley, Julie
Commitee: Egan, Terri
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Organizational Development
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Organizational behavior, Native American studies
Keywords: Community, Native americans, Oneida nation, Self-identity, Sense of belonging, Tribal membership
Publication Number: 10749936
ISBN: 9780438414945
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