Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Maya and Roman Deities: A Comparison and Contrast in Iconography, Mythological Legends, Traits and Similarities
by Austin, Marcia Lynn, M.A., California State University, Los Angeles, 2018, 114; 10814429
Abstract (Summary)

The origin of this paper came about many years ago when I saw a church on the Mexican highway to Acapulco, framed under the huge mountainous shape of one of volcanoes outside of Mexico City.

College-aged, and with a group of Americans, I neglected to bring a camera. But the sight of a church with a gold trimmed turquoise and yellow dome; inspired me to want to know more about other cultures.

I realized at that moment that there were no churches like the Mexican churches in the United States. The cultural framing and the landscape differed so much from the United States that I was spellbound. It was a picturesque moment. For the first time in my life, at that moment, I was in a culture where I had to speak a foreign language, and that was Spanish. I saw that the visual memories I had of the United States of America sharply contrasted with the volcanic view before me.

This was a cultural clash instant. At that moment, I wanted to compare and contrast cultures because illustrating the similarities of a culture is an important procedure. Dissecting traits and different mythological legends and isolating them, and then comparing them to other ancient legends and legacies is a study, and I want to accomplish it. The essential nuances of Maya and Roman cultural icons and symbols, are an enhancing study. The Maya, Roman, Etruscan, and Dionysus Mysteries make a poignant discovery.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Davis, Rebecca
Commitee: Aguilar, Manuel, Cho, Miko
School: California State University, Los Angeles
Department: Art
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art history
Keywords: Maya, Roman dieties
Publication Number: 10814429
ISBN: 9780438372528
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