Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Reading Fluency and the HELPS Program
by Schuh, Melanie M., M.S., Minot State University, 2018, 47; 10929582
Abstract (Summary)

Reading fluency and comprehension were identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) as two of the five critical components for learning to read. The purpose of this single subject preposttest study was to determine if the Helping Early Literacy with Practice Strategies (HELPS) program would increase the reading fluency and comprehension of a third-grade student reading below grade level. The HELPS program was designed to help students strengthen reading fluency (Begeny, 2009). Using the Gray Oral Reading Test, 5th Edition, the pre-posttest scores showed slight improvements in fluency and comprehension. The study was conducted over six weeks. It began by giving the student the Gray Oral Reading Test 5th Edition (GORT) as a pretest. The HELPS program was then administered for six weeks. At the end of the six week intervention period the student was given Form B of the GORT as a post-test. The student made slight gains in fluency and comprehension, but not large enough gain was made to definitively say the intervention was the cause of the increase. Although fluency and comprehension did not show the desired increase, the student did gain confidence in her reading ability. This was a single-subject study and can only be used to make determinations for this student. While these findings cannot be used to determine how the intervention will work for other students, the confidence this student gained throughout the intervention period was worth doing the intervention.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pedersen, Holly
Commitee: Borden-King, Lisa, Garnes, Lori
School: Minot State University
Department: Special Education
School Location: United States -- North Dakota
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Reading instruction
Keywords: Reading fluency
Publication Number: 10929582
ISBN: 9780438282254
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