Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A Woman's Work Is Never Done: Mapping Social Reproduction Theory in the Artwork of Mierle Laderman Ukeles and Mary Kelly
by Kaeser, Amy, M.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2018, 101; 10825803
Abstract (Summary)

With a heightened sense of responsibility for social concerns, artists in the 1970s begin to move beyond the analytic propositions of US conceptualists such as Joseph Kosuth, Sol Lewitt and conceptual groups like Art & Language, to a synthesis of interrogating the social, political, economic, and gendered systems historically used to oppress women and minority groups. The artwork of the U.S.-based Mierle Laderman Ukeles and the U.K.-based Mary Kelly’s early work from 1969 to 1975 reflect central concerns of the women’s movements and is well researched by scholars of art history, but I claim that the production by both artists at this early moment also acknowledges the work of social reproduction, if not directly referencing it in their practices. My goal is to renew interest in the discourse of social reproduction theory and the Wages for Housework movement championed by Silvia Federici and Mariarosa Dalla Costa in the early 1970s as being vital to the progression of women’s interventions in the visual arts. This thesis is my endeavor at recovering those voices of Italian feminists that are underrepresented or missing entirely in the history of the international women’s movement and canonical art history.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Shaked, Nizan
Commitee: Paquette, Catha, Proctor-Tiffany, Mariah
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Art
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Art history, Womens studies, Museum studies
Keywords: Conceptual art, Feminist movement, Kelly, Mary, Social practice, Social reproduction theory, Ueles, Mierle Laderman
Publication Number: 10825803
ISBN: 9780438258778
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