Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Pedosedimentäre Archive in Prähistorischen Fundplätzen in Franken
by Krech, Martin, Ph.D., Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany), 2018, 201; 10971616
Abstract (Summary)

Pedosedimentary archives make an important contribution to the reconstruction of landscape history. Since the beginning of the Holocene settlements and land use activities led to significant modifications of relief and soils. The extent and type of soil erosion and the associated formation of colluvials are essentially determined not only by natural factors but also by land use. Thus soils and colluvial contain important information about the original landscape, former land use phases and environmental changes. The specific features in combination with the archaeological findings allow for conclusions about past natural and cultural areas. The present work applied an interdisciplinary approach with archaeological and physical-geographical methods to analyse the settlement and landscape development of the investigated areas in Franconia. Therefor three study areas were selected in the Keuper landscape of Franconia: (1) the Bullenheimer Berg was chosen because of its important settlement history, with profiles located in different areas on its plateau. The locations (2) Marktbergel-West II and (3) Ergersheim are located in the area of the Franconian gypsum karst. The results show that the anthropogenic influence led to a significant change in the landscape. For the study areas a long history of human use can be proven since the beginning of the Holocene.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Terhorst, Birgit, Sponholz, Barbara
Commitee:
School: Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)
School Location: Germany
Source: DAI-C 81/1(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Paleoclimate Science
Keywords: Pedosedimentary archives
Publication Number: 10971616
ISBN: 9781392402597
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