Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Islam between Northwest China and Central Asia, 1530-1673: A Brief Survey
by Zhang, Zong, M.A., Indiana University, 2018, 80; 10841695
Abstract (Summary)

In this thesis I aim to tell a facet of the story about Muslim life in Northwest China between 1530 and 1673: how Islam gradually became a substantial part of Northwest Chinese social life before Afaq Khoja's arrival and the establishment of Sufi communities. The narrative of a Naqshbandi "mission" directed by Afaq Khoja that greatly altered the development of Islam in Northwest China have dominated traditional Chinese historiography on late-17th century Northwest China. Based on evidences spread through official chronicles and private accounts, this thesis moved beyond such a narrative and argues that Muslims had already become an alienable part of Northwest China with significant presence in terms of residence, commerce, and most importantly, the way of practicing Islam.

More importantly, both the source of Muslim population inflow and Islamic messages no doubt came from Central Asia (including Altishahr), where new trends of Islam changed the religio-political landscape. Although there is no clear evidence that Muslims in Northwest China ever formed a unified political power that was linked with Central Asia, events in Central Asia did have "repercussions" on Northwest China since they are geographically and culturally bounded. The period was crucial for the formation of Chinese Muslim identity

The thesis is exploratory in nature, suggesting a number of possibilities that are waiting for further research.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: DeWeese, Devin
Commitee: DeWeese, Devin, Sela, Ron, Vogt, Nick
School: Indiana University
Department: Central Eurasian Studies
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Asian History, Islamic Studies, Regional Studies
Keywords: Central Asia, Islam, Madrasa, Northwest China, Religion, Sufi
Publication Number: 10841695
ISBN: 9780438245778
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