Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An American Response to International Chinese Predatory Economic Practices in the Geopolitical Contest of the 21st Century
by Rajpurohit, Krishna, M.A., The William Paterson University of New Jersey, 2018, 157; 10839174
Abstract (Summary)

A international economic competition is taking shape on the world stage today. The Chinese hope to challenge America’s standing as the leader of the International order. This will be one of the greatest threats to American economic independence, national security, and international prestige in the last one hundred years. This endeavor under way in Asia which begins with a desire to reestablish the Middle Kingdom in China. The force behind this a combination of the Communist Party’s desire to hold onto total power and Xi Jingpings growing cult of personality. The United States as the current dominant global economic and security power should expect the Chinese to challenge Americas standing. Not only will they actively attempt to undercut American leadership but their projects will become geopolitical risks. This challenge will become a national security risk once the Chinese reach vital American interests. The US debt, the trade deficit, and the access the Chinese have gained to the American technology sector and defense and industrial base are the most important vulnerabilities that must be addressed. This century’s world order will be a product of this great power competition between the established United States and the revisionist Peoples Republic of China.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mason, John
Commitee: Chaddha, Maya, Shalom, Stephen
School: The William Paterson University of New Jersey
Department: Public Policy and International Affairs
School Location: United States -- New Jersey
Source: MAI 58/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Foreign language education, Public policy
Keywords: China, Debt for equity, Economic codependency, Geopolitical, International relations, South Asia
Publication Number: 10839174
ISBN: 978-0-438-17271-5
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