Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Utilizing Parent Support Groups to Improve Parenting Efficacy and Relationships for Parents of Inattentive, Hyperactive, or Non-compliant Children
by Hake, Deborah Rickman, Ed.D., Lindenwood University, 2018, 143; 10841419
Abstract (Summary)

School age children with ADHD suffer functional impairment in social development, show signs of emotional dysregulation, and have learning difficulties. Other psychological disorders may present, and some children may have one or more co-morbid disorders. Studies demonstrated that the best practice was combined treatment. It was recommended that a pharmacological and behavioral approach be utilized.

ADHD also affects the family. Parents of children with ADHD often neglect their own health caring and advocating for their child. The amount of parent involvement raising a child with ADHD can lead to reactive parenting, strained relationships with spouses, social and emotional isolation, depression, and anxiety.

Prevailing research demonstrated far-reaching impacts of ADHD on the child and the family, but little was published on parent support groups for this parent population or on the benefits of yoga for improving the child’s ability to self-monitor.

This research sought to demonstrate that improvement in parenting efficacy, parenting stress, and the parent-child relationship could be achieved through a parent support group.

The researcher utilized a parent support group because parents of children with ADHD were often socially and emotionally isolated. Through the parent support group, parents revealed the daily challenges and shared parenting strategies. Sharing success stories was shown to promote a greater sense of parenting efficacy. While the sample was small, common themes emerged which further illustrated the parenting challenges of raising a child with ADHD. Positive outcomes of this study were a greater sense of parenting skills, social support, and enhanced parent-child relationships.

This research also sought to demonstrate that regular practice of yoga would lead to improvement in the child’s self-monitoring. Although parents and children attended the weekly session with fidelity, parent-taught or parent-led practice at home was commonly missed due to parents’ other commitments and the child’s sports or summer activities. The effectiveness of yoga to improve the child’s ability to self-monitor could not be validated.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Sherblom, Stephen
Commitee: Freeman, Janis, Steffes, Robert
School: Lindenwood University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Missouri
Source: DAI-A 79/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Individual & family studies
Keywords: ADHD, Parent involvement, Parent-child relationship
Publication Number: 10841419
ISBN: 978-0-438-19229-4
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