Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

U.S. STEM Workforce Views of Outstanding Leadership: A Correlational Study
by Doel-Hammond, Deborah, Ed.D., Pepperdine University, 2018, 202; 10813873
Abstract (Summary)

Objective: This study explored views of outstanding leadership among the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals working in the United States within the business and industry sector. U.S. STEM occupations are projected to experience 11.1% growth between 2016 and 2026, higher than the projected 7.4% growth for all occupations (U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2017a). The U.S. has undertaken aggressive STEM educational reform and recruiting, to ensure the nation’s continued prosperity and national security (National Science Board, 2018b; U.S. Department of Education, 2018). A shift in U.S. STEM demographics will present challenges for business leaders, human resources (HR) practitioners, and educators who prepare leaders for the increasingly cross-cultural workplace. Method: This correlational study applied the GLOBE leadership scales to explore study participants’ views according to gender, age, national origin group, number of years worked in the U.S, and workforce category. Results: The five leader attributes rated as most contributing to outstanding leadership were: (a) trustworthy, (b) clear, (c) sincere, (d) inspirational, and (e) diplomatic. There were 64 statistically significant correlations of low strength and 1 of moderate strength.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Schmieder-Ramirez, June
Commitee: Cooper, Christie, McManus, Jack
School: Pepperdine University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 79/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Education Policy, Education, Science education
Keywords: Business and industry, Cross-cultural perspectives, Implicit leadership theory, Leadership, STEM, STEM education
Publication Number: 10813873
ISBN: 978-0-438-15620-3
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